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Bullmastiff

bullmastiffBreed Group: Working

Height: 24 to 27 inches at the shoulder

Weight: 100 to 130 pounds

Life Span: 8 to 12 years

The strong-willed Bullmastiff is not afraid of anything and would lay down his life for his family. Mild-mannered and sweet unless incited, this 130-pound guard dog will lean on your leg and sit on your feet while he snorts, snuffles and drools.

Did You Know the Bullmastiff Makes a Good Therapy Dog?

Although loving and sweet natured, the Bullmastiff is a large guard dog with a mind of his own. He needs an assertive, experienced owner. Bullmastiffs can be willful and are not likely to back down once aroused.

This powerhouse of a dog weighs between 100 and 130 pounds and has a mind of his own, with the muscle to back his intentions. He’s devoted to his human family, particularly children, so a well-bred, well-socialized Bullmastiff is an excellent family dog. Just be sure to set boundaries with him from a young age; he needs lots of firm, consistent training and exposure to all kinds of people and situations to develop the common sense and instincts to temper his strength and encourage his kindness.

The Bullmastiff is not highly active, but he successfully competes in obedience, agility, tracking and carting, and he makes a good therapy dog. He’s intelligent and a quick study, but he’s not big on repetitive training.

Bullmastiffs are guard dogs and will protect their family and property. They require a fenced yard and should never be allowed to roam.

The Bullmastiff does not love other dogs, especially if they are of the same sex. It’s extremely difficult to house a male Bullmastiff and another male dog of any breed together. Even dogs that live in peace for years can one day become implacable enemies. Bullmastiffs also have a high prey drive, and many Bullmastiffs cannot live with cats for that reason.

Bullmastiffs drool. They drool after eating and drinking, exercise, while smelling food, when they’re warm or hot, and when they’re stressed. Drooling is a part of the Bullmastiff experience, although some drool more than others. A safe rule of thumb is that the longer the jowls are, the more drool you can expect from a Bullmastiff. Carrying a drool towel is a good idea, as is accepting the concept of drool streaks on your clothing and belongings.

Despite his size, the Bullmastiff can live in an apartment if you don’t mind constantly bumping into or stepping over him. He doesn’t need much exercise, nor is he much of a barker. His grooming needs are modest, too: brush him a couple of times a week to keep shedding to a minimum, and make sure his ears are clean and his nails are trimmed.

What he does need is to be a part of the family. This is a dog who forms very deep bonds to the humans with whom he lives, and isolating him in the yard or the garage, or expecting him to spend most of his time alone, is guaranteed to make him a very unhappy dog – and a very badly behaved, destructive and possibly dangerous one based on his size.

Make him a family member, and he’ll be a strong, mostly silent guardian of your home and children, and an intensely loyal companion. His training and socialization needs to be taken seriously, starting when he is a puppy, before bad habits have a chance to take hold. In particular, you need to teach your Bullmastiff not to pull on the leash or jump on people, or he’ll be a hazard to anyone he’s around when he’s full-grown. This dog can knock an NFL linebacker off his feet.

Bullmastiffs usually love children, but the reality of a dog this big is that he can unwittingly hurt or scare a child. Be cautious and always supervise dogs and kids when they’re together. If you have toddlers, consider waiting until they’re older to bring a Bullmastiff into your family.

Other Quick Facts About the Bullmastiff

The Bullmastiff’s colors include red, fawn or brindle.

Bullmastiffs will drive out unknown animals from their yard and home.

Bullmastiffs do not have a high energy level and are satisfied with short daily walks.

More info here

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