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Pomeranian

 

pomerarnianBreed Group: Toy

Height: 8 to 12 inches at the shoulder

Weight: 3 to 7 pounds, sometimes larger

Life Span: 15 years or longer

Tiny and bright-eyed, the spunky Pomeranian greets the world with endless curiosity and a sure sense that he’s the cutest thing around. He is clever, adaptable, and happy, whether hanging at home or performing as a top athlete on an agility course.

Did You Know the Pomeranian Has a Double Coat?

The original Pomeranians weighed 20 to 30 pounds — much larger than the Pom that we know and love today.

Pomeranians are the tiniest of the Spitz, or Nordic, breeds, but they have the courage of much bigger dogs. A perennially popular breed, the Pom weighs less than 7 pounds, but you won’t often find him in a puppy purse. That’s because Pomeranians think big. They know they have four feet and prefer to use them, just as larger dogs would.

Everything about the Pomeranian is bright: his eyes, his temperament, and his intelligence. Though he’s very fond of his family and delighted to get some lap time, he’s also a busy little guy. You’re more likely to find him trotting around your house on an important mission than snoozing on the sofa.

The Pom’s activity level makes him an ideal pet for someone who wants a small dog with the personality traits of the full-size sled and herding dogs from which this breed originates. Because he’s tiny, he can probably get enough exercise indoors, but he’s happiest when he gets to go on long walks, chase leaves, and play with other small dogs. He is athletic and frequently participates in dog sports such as agility, freestyle, obedience, rally, and tracking. Because of his diminutive size, he is suited to life in an apartment, but he is just as at home on a ranch or estate. However, he’s far too tiny to live outdoors. He needs to live inside with his family.

Pomeranians have a profuse double coat that needs regular brushing but are otherwise easy to care for. And, make no mistake, Poms bark. It may not be deafening, but it can be annoying and difficult to stop, even with training. As with many small dogs, Pomeranians may be harder to housetrain.

Ask your breeder about any behavior or health problems in dogs related to your prospective puppy. If she says there aren’t any, run. She should provide you with written documentation from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) that the parents of the puppy had normal hips, elbows, and knees, as well as from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation (CERF), certifying that they were free of vision problems.

A Pomeranian can go to his new home at 8 to 10 weeks of age, but some breeders like to keep pups until they are 12 to 14 weeks old to make sure they are mature enough to go to their new homes and to see which ones will shake out as show prospects.

Other Quick Facts About the Pomeranian

The breed became popular in 1888 after Queen Victoria fell in love with a Pom while vacationing in Italy.

Pomeranians have a thick, beautiful coat that comes in many colors and patterns, and they are easy to groom.

Pomeranians get along well with other pets but should be protected from rambunctious children.

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